Sheet Pan Goguma Mattang (Candied Sweet Potatoes)

Justine Lee's avatar
Justine Lee

Ingredients

The Goguma

  • 1/4
    teaspoon Baking soda
  • 1/2
    teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 1.5
    pounds (about 2 medium) Korean or Japanese sweet potatoes
    scrubbed
  • 3
    tablespoons Extra virgin olive oil

The Syrup

  • 2
    tablespoons Honey
  • 2
    tablespoons Water
  • 3
    tablespoons Granulated sugar
  • 2
    teaspoons Roasted black sesame seeds
    plus more for garnish

Instructions

1
Preheat oven to 425°F. Bring a pot of water to a boil. While you wait, chop 1.5 pounds (about 2 medium) Korean or Japanese sweet potatoes (scrubbed) into big chunks.
2
To the boiling water, add 1/4 teaspoon Baking soda, potato chunks, and stir. Bring back to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Let cook until a fork can easily pierce when inserted into the flesh, about 10 minutes.
3
Drain the potatoes and transfer to a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with 3 tablespoons Extra virgin olive oil, maybe more to coat the sheet pan. Season with 1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt. Toss everything to coat. Evenly spread out the potatoes with the cut side
4
Roast potatoes for 20 minutes. Remove from oven to flip over. Return to the oven and roast for 10 more minutes. They should be extremely golden brown and crispy to the touch.
5
Prepare the syrup. In the reserved pot, add 2 tablespoons Water, 3 tablespoons Granulated sugar, and 2 tablespoons Honey over medium heat. Without stirring, let it cook until the sugar has completely melted and the mixture has comes to a boil, about 3-5
6
With the sugar syrup on low heat, add in the roasted sweet potatoes. Mix to coat each piece evenly. Garnish with about 2 teaspoons Roasted black sesame seeds (plus more for garnish).
7
Transfer potatoes to a serving bowl. Garnish with more black sesame seeds. Goguma mattang is best served fresh but it keeps well in the fridge to be eaten at a later time.
Justine Lee's avatar
Preheat oven to 425°F. Bring a pot of water to a boil. While you wait, chop 1.5 pounds (about 2 medium) Korean or Japanese sweet potatoes (scrubbed) into big chunks.