Baechu Kimchi

Mary Kim's avatar
Mary Kim

Ingredients

  • 3 cups
    water
    2:1 water to salt ratio
  • 1 1/2 cup
    Kosher Salt
    1/4 cup per pound of cabbage
  • 1 cup
    Garlic
    minced
  • 2 tbsp
    Dashida
  • 1/4 cup
    Ginger
    minced
  • 1/4 cup
    Fish Sauce
  • 2 tbsp
    Shrimp Brine
  • 2 cups
    Gochugaru
  • 1/4 cup
    Sugar
  • 1 cup
    Apple Sauce
  • 4 cups
    Water
  • Green Onion
  • Daikon Radish
  • Carrots
  • Chives

Instructions

1
Curing Cabbages 1 1/2 cup Kosher Salt (1/4 cup per pound of cabbage) 3 cups water (2:1 water to salt ratio) - Weigh cabbages - Cut whole cabbages in half - Cut a slice in the halves (like you are going to quarter, but not all the way) - Rinse cabbages to prepare for brine - Brine cabbages in 1/4 C salt to 1 lb of cabbage. - Water level should be at least 2:1 water to salt If the cabbages are not properly cured, your kimchi has the tendency to go bad faster. I typically like to do a extra salty brine to ensure a proper cure. On the flip side, my kimchi sauce is typically unsalted to balance out the overall flavors. This method has worked out well for me, and I am able to keep the the fermentation process going at a steady rate. If your cabbages end up being too salty, soak them in fresh water until the salt levels are good.
2
Making the paste 4 cups Water 2 cups Gochugaru 1 cup Garlic (minced) 1 cup Apple Sauce 1/4 cup Ginger (minced) 1/4 cup Sugar 1/4 cup Fish Sauce 2 tbsp Dashida 2 tbsp Shrimp Brine - Mix water and glutinous rice flour together in a microwave safe bowl - Cover with saran wrap (with a small vent hole) and microwave at 2 minute increments until a thick paste/glue forms. - Make sure to mix the glue in between each heating to evenly distribute the rice flour. - Also, take care to not overflow the mixture, because it can bubble up near the end of the heating cycle. - Mine took about 8 total minutes - Cool the glue before adding any of the aromatics - Add in your korean red pepper flakes, garlic, apple sauce, ginger, sugar, fish sauce, dashida, and shrimp brine - Make sure to finely chop shrimp brine before adding to avoid having big chunks in your final kimchi - Mix well and store in air tight container - this should keep for a little while and can be used for more kimchi batches in the future!
3
Filling Daikon Radish Green Onion Carrots Chives - Finely julienne your radish, carrots, green onions, and chives into about 2” long pieces - If your green onions are too thick, slice them lengthwise to get rid of some bulk - Make as much as you want - but if your kimchi is too salty, you can add more veggies to compensate - Add a couple of cups of sauce to your veggies and make a sauce mixture. - Take a handful of mixture and paint onto your cabbages, making sure to deposit some sauce in between each cabbage leaf. - If you want to make a more “aesthetically pleasing” kimchi, to keep your veggies to the inner portions of your cabbage and don’t let them stick out the side. You want your cabbages to look as clean as possible - Once your cabbages are well seasoned, take the outer leaf and wrap it around the front to tuck everything in neatly. - Place them into an airtight container belly up (not too airtight - you don’t want the jar to explode). - Make sure not to overfill your container (no more than 60% full), because as the kimchi ferments, it will continue to create liquid. The worst thing to deal with is spilled kimchi juice on our countertop. - If you want to kickstart the fermentation process, leave it on your countertop for a couple of days before placing into your fridge. Make sure to occasionally baste your kimchi so your cabbages are evenly seasoned - If you want to keep the fermentation process slow and steady (if you made in bulk and want your kimchi to be at a good funk in a few months), place it directly into your fridge.
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Mary Kim's avatar
Curing Cabbages 1 1/2 cup Kosher Salt (1/4 cup per pound of cabbage) 3 cups water (2:1 water to salt ratio) - Weigh cabbages - Cut whole cabbages in half - Cut a slice in the halves (like you are going to quarter, but not all the way) - Rinse cabbages to prepare for brine - Brine cabbages in 1/4 C salt to 1 lb of cabbage. - Water level should be at least 2:1 water to salt If the cabbages are not properly cured, your kimchi has the tendency to go bad faster. I typically like to do a extra salty brine to ensure a proper cure. On the flip side, my kimchi sauce is typically unsalted to balance out the overall flavors. This method has worked out well for me, and I am able to keep the the fermentation process going at a steady rate. If your cabbages end up being too salty, soak them in fresh water until the salt levels are good.